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Archive for the ‘Blended family’ Category

As a single parent, it is normal that at some point you will want to begin to date again and that hopefully you will find someone with whom you would like to spend a lot of your time.  At some point, you will need to introduce this other person to your teenage children which can be complicated and cause you some significant stress and anxiety.  Likely you will worry about what your teenager will think of this new person in your life and what this person will think of your teenager.  (Before going further, it is important to note that this article is referring to parents who are in at least semi-serious dating relationships.  It is generally never advisable to introduce children to individuals if the relationship is only causal as this can be confusing to them.  In addition, you certainly don’t want them becoming attached to someone who you know will not be in your life for very long.)  Introducing someone new to your teenager can be even further complicated if your teenager holds resentment following a divorce, or is still holding onto hope that you will get back together with their other parent.  In such situations, introducing a new partner to your teenager will force them to see the reality that you are not reconciling with their other parent which can result in some difficult emotions for them.

Below are some tips for you, as the parent, if you are in a situation where you are dating someone and feel it is time for them to be introduced to your teen.

  1. Make sure you are feeling the relationship is going to last.  By this I don’t mean forever since nobody can predict what will happen years down the road, however, if you see that the relationship will be short-lived, it is not advisable to introduce the other person to your children.
  2. Make sure the other person is open to meeting your children.  If they are not, you should take a close look at the reasons why and question if this is someone who is appropriate for you to be in a relationship with.  The reality is that you have children who are an important part of your life and if the other person is not interested in getting to know them, you will likely end up feeling very conflicted and set yourself up for a lot of guilt and stress.
  3. Prepare your teen.  Don’t “surprise” them with a visit from your new love interest.  This will likely not go over well at all and you will then have to undo any damage done.  It is best to tell your teenager that you are interested in someone and that since they (meaning your teenager) are the most important thing in your life, you would like them to meet this person and let you know what they think.
  4. Don’t “sell” your boyfriend / girlfriend.  Your teenager is smarter than you may think and they will pick up on this.  It is fine to just say, “I want you to meet this person because they are a really good person and they treat me well”.  If your teenager asks further questions then you should answer them honestly but don’t make the person out to be more than they are or feel you have to be a salesperson for them.
  5. Do something activity based.  Try to minimize the pressure of just sitting and having a conversation.  Even sitting and eating dinner can make people feel forced to just sit and talk which can be uncomfortable.  Think about going bowling, to a movie or to a sporting event that will allow for interaction but much less pressure to simply sit and talk.
  6. Don’t be phony.  Make sure that you act like yourself.  Your teenager will pick up on any changes to your personality and will likely see it as very negative.  They still want you to be their mom or dad as they know you, so make sure you are comfortable with what you do so that you can be yourself.
  7. Reassure.  Reassure your teenager that they are the most important thing in your life, no matter what.  If you have started dating, your time with them may have lessened or you may seem more distracted.  It is important to remember that your teenager will be sensitive to this and that they will need reassurance both verbally and through your actions that they are still number one.

For more free resources for parents of teenagers go to www.HowToParentATeen.com.

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Parents often face challenges, resistance and uncertainly from their children (especially teenagers) when blending two families together.  For information about why this happens check out my blog titled Blending A Family:  Why This Can Be Such A Challenge With Teens here:  http://bit.ly/N1xxjW.  When going through this process, there are some things that parents can do to help their teenager.  Below are 5 tips for parents facing challenges in this process:

  1. Be patient.  Remember that this process takes time and that there are bound to be some bumps along the way.  Despite your eagerness to having things work out so that everyone is comfortable and happy, there will be an adjustment period that will take time.
  2. Be clear.  Don’t give your teenager any false hope or idea that you will back down from your plan to blend your families unless you are prepared to actually do this.  It is better to be clear with them about what is happening than to give the false hope or information about what is taking place.
  3. Make time for your teenager.  Even though they may reject your offers to spend time with them, it is important that you are offering it so that they still feel special. If there are things you did that used to just be the two of you that now include several other people (i.e. dinner time, watching television at night) you should try to carve out time periodically to do these activities – just you and your teen.  It is normal that they may resent having to share this time with others so it is important that you validate them in their feelings and help to make sure they feel included and important at all times.
  4. Establish routines.  Although teens will tell you they hate routines, they benefit greatly from them and actually feel better with the predictability of having a routine.  All of your routines will likely require some adjustment as you blend your families.  Try to get input from everyone about what will work and promote that everyone make some compromises as needed.  It is good to think about structuring things like morning routines, chores, having friends over, television watching, meal times, etc.
  5. Establish clear rules and be consistent.  You and your new partner will need to make some decisions about rules and consequences.  As I have discussed in other articles, your teenager needs to see you as a united front so you should never have disagreements about rules in front of them.  In addition, once you are able to establish rules, it is important to share them with your teenager upfront so that they are aware of your expectations and the consequences for not following them.

For more parenting support designed specifically for parents of teenagers go to www.HowToParentATeen.com

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On top of the stress of being the parent of a teenager, you may also be dealing with the stress of creating a blended family.  This can be a challenge to say the least, however, it is certainly not impossible and many parents of teenagers are able to successfully blend two families.  As we all know, the Brady Bunch family is not reality and therefore we should never use such unrealistic families as our vision of how things will be.  Blending families means balancing the needs of your adult relationship with those of your children while you all go through a significant change.  It is important that during this process, you do not minimize the impact such a change can have on all of you.

Your teenager may be resentful of the many changes they are being asked to deal with.  Some of these changes may include:  having to share your time, changing their routines, having to share their personal space, television, computer or phone time, changing family roles, having to adjust to new rules and feeling a little less comfortable in their own home while adjusting to living with new family members.  It is important to acknowledge these changes and let them know you appreciate how difficult the changes may be for them.  If you are looking for support in how to do this go to www.HowToParentATeenn.com  and download the free audio program that walks you through the skill of validation which can make a huge difference in a situation where you are blending a family.   Any resentment from your teenager could take on many forms including acting out, isolating or a refusal to accept that you have a new significant other.

Since you, as the parent, are also experiencing a lot of change and may likely be feeling torn between your child and your new mate, it is important that you acknowledge and address any stress you are experiencing throughout this process.  You will be better able to help with the overall adjustment process if you are making sure that you are taking care of yourself.

For more parenting support go to www.HowToParentATeen.com or like us on facebook for a free parent guide at www.facebook.com/HowToParentATeen.

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